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How to Eat Like a Marathoner While on the Road

How to Eat Like a Marathoner While on the Road


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Before hitting the road, long-distance runner Michael Arnstein fuels his body with the right eats, which can be a challenge on the road.

Arnstein, who placed 30th overall in the 2011 ING New York City Marathon with a time of 2:28.12, has run 60 competitive marathons, completed four Hawaii Ironmans, and specializes in races of 100 miles and longer, often taking first place. Adhering to a "fruitarian" diet rich in fruits (and vegetables) has helped Arnstein achieve his running goals.

Arnstein takes his tips for eating healthy on the go no matter where the racing trail takes him. When he is jet-setting to distance races in far-off lands, Arnstein carries food that can get past airport security, like navel oranges.

"Oranges are my favorite because they keep you hydrated, you don't need any tools to open or eat them, and they are super high in immune-strengthening properties for germ-ridden planes," said Arnstein, who typically takes two to three oranges per hour of the flight.

Arnstein skips airport food and concedes that apples and bananas can get a little boring, so he uses trips as opportunities to try something new and exotic.

"If you bring something exotic or different it can make the food option more enjoyable," said Arnstein who suggests Asian pears, Medjool dates, baby bananas, and rare plums and grape varieties. "Different countries have different types of fruit available all year round, so a big part of traveling to a new country is trying new local or unique items that aren’t available at your home markets."

In addition to sticking to his diet plan, Arnstein also stays on track by exercising on the road.

"As a runner, there is no better way to see a new place than to run it. I’m more motivated to exercise on vacation than at home because there is so much to explore," said Arnstein.

Though it’s hard to watch others around him indulge in junk food, Arnstein stays focused and splurges on top-quality organic foods like exotic cherry tomatoes instead.

"I try to splurge on health at all times, so for me I don’t forget how I feel after I eat something that makes me feel like crap," said Arnstein. "I keep that clear and focused in my mind so I always feel my best."


The Power of Diet for Runners: How to Eat for Endurance and Lose Weight Effortlessly

This is what happens with a Wholefoods gift card. I go crazy like a kid in a candy shop – or like a food fanatic who can’t control his craving for healthy, delicious snacks.

But I used to be a glutton. Being naturally skinny, I never had to worry about eating crappy food because I never gained an ounce. Running throughout high school and college only reinforced my bad eating habits. I had no idea what a healthy diet for a runner should look like.

It’s somewhat embarrassing, but I want to tell you a quick story about my favorite time of day as a freshman in college. You might be thinking, “Saturday night!” or “Race day!” or maybe even “When Jason had class with that hot girl he had a crush on!”

Unfortunately, none of those are true. Being 99% residential, Connecticut College had a damn good dining hall and an unlimited meal plan.

Every day, I looked forward to dinner after cross country practice like a normal person does with Christmas. I had also learned that the human body doesn’t register the feeling of fullness or satisfaction from a meal until about 15 minutes after you start eating. So I loaded my tray with a big plate, several smaller plates, and at least one bowl – all full of food.

Then the eating would start. I literally loved to stuff my face full of whatever they were serving:

  • chicken breast sandwiches with double cheese, ranch dressing, and bacon
  • pepperoni pizza dipped in ranch dressing
  • barbecue pork subs with french fries
  • pasta with meat sauce and melted cheese
  • hot dogs, cheeseburgers, and more Lucky Charms than is reasonable or sane (I LOVE cereal)

Clearly, I had a problem. I was like the sheltered home-schooled kid who went buck wild and couldn’t contain his partying once he was set free from the parental leash. Except with food.

Fast forward to February of my Senior year. I had a physical over Winter Break and my lab work came back with a startling result: my total cholesterol was at 211 (under 200 is considered healthy) and my LDL and HDL levels were all out of whack.

After over 22 years of pristine health, I came to the unfortunate conclusion that I was not immune to the side effects of a shitty diet. Despite a healthy weight of about 132 pounds for my height of 5′ 7″ and high levels of exercise, I wasn’t as healthy as I could be.

The saying, “If the furnace is hot enough, it will burn anything” isn’t quite true – it clearly wasn’t burning through the excess cholesterol floating through my body. While cholesterol isn’t a great indicator of overall health (I now think slightly high cholesterol isn’t something to worry about), it made me realize that I needed to make some changes.


The Power of Diet for Runners: How to Eat for Endurance and Lose Weight Effortlessly

This is what happens with a Wholefoods gift card. I go crazy like a kid in a candy shop – or like a food fanatic who can’t control his craving for healthy, delicious snacks.

But I used to be a glutton. Being naturally skinny, I never had to worry about eating crappy food because I never gained an ounce. Running throughout high school and college only reinforced my bad eating habits. I had no idea what a healthy diet for a runner should look like.

It’s somewhat embarrassing, but I want to tell you a quick story about my favorite time of day as a freshman in college. You might be thinking, “Saturday night!” or “Race day!” or maybe even “When Jason had class with that hot girl he had a crush on!”

Unfortunately, none of those are true. Being 99% residential, Connecticut College had a damn good dining hall and an unlimited meal plan.

Every day, I looked forward to dinner after cross country practice like a normal person does with Christmas. I had also learned that the human body doesn’t register the feeling of fullness or satisfaction from a meal until about 15 minutes after you start eating. So I loaded my tray with a big plate, several smaller plates, and at least one bowl – all full of food.

Then the eating would start. I literally loved to stuff my face full of whatever they were serving:

  • chicken breast sandwiches with double cheese, ranch dressing, and bacon
  • pepperoni pizza dipped in ranch dressing
  • barbecue pork subs with french fries
  • pasta with meat sauce and melted cheese
  • hot dogs, cheeseburgers, and more Lucky Charms than is reasonable or sane (I LOVE cereal)

Clearly, I had a problem. I was like the sheltered home-schooled kid who went buck wild and couldn’t contain his partying once he was set free from the parental leash. Except with food.

Fast forward to February of my Senior year. I had a physical over Winter Break and my lab work came back with a startling result: my total cholesterol was at 211 (under 200 is considered healthy) and my LDL and HDL levels were all out of whack.

After over 22 years of pristine health, I came to the unfortunate conclusion that I was not immune to the side effects of a shitty diet. Despite a healthy weight of about 132 pounds for my height of 5′ 7″ and high levels of exercise, I wasn’t as healthy as I could be.

The saying, “If the furnace is hot enough, it will burn anything” isn’t quite true – it clearly wasn’t burning through the excess cholesterol floating through my body. While cholesterol isn’t a great indicator of overall health (I now think slightly high cholesterol isn’t something to worry about), it made me realize that I needed to make some changes.


The Power of Diet for Runners: How to Eat for Endurance and Lose Weight Effortlessly

This is what happens with a Wholefoods gift card. I go crazy like a kid in a candy shop – or like a food fanatic who can’t control his craving for healthy, delicious snacks.

But I used to be a glutton. Being naturally skinny, I never had to worry about eating crappy food because I never gained an ounce. Running throughout high school and college only reinforced my bad eating habits. I had no idea what a healthy diet for a runner should look like.

It’s somewhat embarrassing, but I want to tell you a quick story about my favorite time of day as a freshman in college. You might be thinking, “Saturday night!” or “Race day!” or maybe even “When Jason had class with that hot girl he had a crush on!”

Unfortunately, none of those are true. Being 99% residential, Connecticut College had a damn good dining hall and an unlimited meal plan.

Every day, I looked forward to dinner after cross country practice like a normal person does with Christmas. I had also learned that the human body doesn’t register the feeling of fullness or satisfaction from a meal until about 15 minutes after you start eating. So I loaded my tray with a big plate, several smaller plates, and at least one bowl – all full of food.

Then the eating would start. I literally loved to stuff my face full of whatever they were serving:

  • chicken breast sandwiches with double cheese, ranch dressing, and bacon
  • pepperoni pizza dipped in ranch dressing
  • barbecue pork subs with french fries
  • pasta with meat sauce and melted cheese
  • hot dogs, cheeseburgers, and more Lucky Charms than is reasonable or sane (I LOVE cereal)

Clearly, I had a problem. I was like the sheltered home-schooled kid who went buck wild and couldn’t contain his partying once he was set free from the parental leash. Except with food.

Fast forward to February of my Senior year. I had a physical over Winter Break and my lab work came back with a startling result: my total cholesterol was at 211 (under 200 is considered healthy) and my LDL and HDL levels were all out of whack.

After over 22 years of pristine health, I came to the unfortunate conclusion that I was not immune to the side effects of a shitty diet. Despite a healthy weight of about 132 pounds for my height of 5′ 7″ and high levels of exercise, I wasn’t as healthy as I could be.

The saying, “If the furnace is hot enough, it will burn anything” isn’t quite true – it clearly wasn’t burning through the excess cholesterol floating through my body. While cholesterol isn’t a great indicator of overall health (I now think slightly high cholesterol isn’t something to worry about), it made me realize that I needed to make some changes.


The Power of Diet for Runners: How to Eat for Endurance and Lose Weight Effortlessly

This is what happens with a Wholefoods gift card. I go crazy like a kid in a candy shop – or like a food fanatic who can’t control his craving for healthy, delicious snacks.

But I used to be a glutton. Being naturally skinny, I never had to worry about eating crappy food because I never gained an ounce. Running throughout high school and college only reinforced my bad eating habits. I had no idea what a healthy diet for a runner should look like.

It’s somewhat embarrassing, but I want to tell you a quick story about my favorite time of day as a freshman in college. You might be thinking, “Saturday night!” or “Race day!” or maybe even “When Jason had class with that hot girl he had a crush on!”

Unfortunately, none of those are true. Being 99% residential, Connecticut College had a damn good dining hall and an unlimited meal plan.

Every day, I looked forward to dinner after cross country practice like a normal person does with Christmas. I had also learned that the human body doesn’t register the feeling of fullness or satisfaction from a meal until about 15 minutes after you start eating. So I loaded my tray with a big plate, several smaller plates, and at least one bowl – all full of food.

Then the eating would start. I literally loved to stuff my face full of whatever they were serving:

  • chicken breast sandwiches with double cheese, ranch dressing, and bacon
  • pepperoni pizza dipped in ranch dressing
  • barbecue pork subs with french fries
  • pasta with meat sauce and melted cheese
  • hot dogs, cheeseburgers, and more Lucky Charms than is reasonable or sane (I LOVE cereal)

Clearly, I had a problem. I was like the sheltered home-schooled kid who went buck wild and couldn’t contain his partying once he was set free from the parental leash. Except with food.

Fast forward to February of my Senior year. I had a physical over Winter Break and my lab work came back with a startling result: my total cholesterol was at 211 (under 200 is considered healthy) and my LDL and HDL levels were all out of whack.

After over 22 years of pristine health, I came to the unfortunate conclusion that I was not immune to the side effects of a shitty diet. Despite a healthy weight of about 132 pounds for my height of 5′ 7″ and high levels of exercise, I wasn’t as healthy as I could be.

The saying, “If the furnace is hot enough, it will burn anything” isn’t quite true – it clearly wasn’t burning through the excess cholesterol floating through my body. While cholesterol isn’t a great indicator of overall health (I now think slightly high cholesterol isn’t something to worry about), it made me realize that I needed to make some changes.


The Power of Diet for Runners: How to Eat for Endurance and Lose Weight Effortlessly

This is what happens with a Wholefoods gift card. I go crazy like a kid in a candy shop – or like a food fanatic who can’t control his craving for healthy, delicious snacks.

But I used to be a glutton. Being naturally skinny, I never had to worry about eating crappy food because I never gained an ounce. Running throughout high school and college only reinforced my bad eating habits. I had no idea what a healthy diet for a runner should look like.

It’s somewhat embarrassing, but I want to tell you a quick story about my favorite time of day as a freshman in college. You might be thinking, “Saturday night!” or “Race day!” or maybe even “When Jason had class with that hot girl he had a crush on!”

Unfortunately, none of those are true. Being 99% residential, Connecticut College had a damn good dining hall and an unlimited meal plan.

Every day, I looked forward to dinner after cross country practice like a normal person does with Christmas. I had also learned that the human body doesn’t register the feeling of fullness or satisfaction from a meal until about 15 minutes after you start eating. So I loaded my tray with a big plate, several smaller plates, and at least one bowl – all full of food.

Then the eating would start. I literally loved to stuff my face full of whatever they were serving:

  • chicken breast sandwiches with double cheese, ranch dressing, and bacon
  • pepperoni pizza dipped in ranch dressing
  • barbecue pork subs with french fries
  • pasta with meat sauce and melted cheese
  • hot dogs, cheeseburgers, and more Lucky Charms than is reasonable or sane (I LOVE cereal)

Clearly, I had a problem. I was like the sheltered home-schooled kid who went buck wild and couldn’t contain his partying once he was set free from the parental leash. Except with food.

Fast forward to February of my Senior year. I had a physical over Winter Break and my lab work came back with a startling result: my total cholesterol was at 211 (under 200 is considered healthy) and my LDL and HDL levels were all out of whack.

After over 22 years of pristine health, I came to the unfortunate conclusion that I was not immune to the side effects of a shitty diet. Despite a healthy weight of about 132 pounds for my height of 5′ 7″ and high levels of exercise, I wasn’t as healthy as I could be.

The saying, “If the furnace is hot enough, it will burn anything” isn’t quite true – it clearly wasn’t burning through the excess cholesterol floating through my body. While cholesterol isn’t a great indicator of overall health (I now think slightly high cholesterol isn’t something to worry about), it made me realize that I needed to make some changes.


The Power of Diet for Runners: How to Eat for Endurance and Lose Weight Effortlessly

This is what happens with a Wholefoods gift card. I go crazy like a kid in a candy shop – or like a food fanatic who can’t control his craving for healthy, delicious snacks.

But I used to be a glutton. Being naturally skinny, I never had to worry about eating crappy food because I never gained an ounce. Running throughout high school and college only reinforced my bad eating habits. I had no idea what a healthy diet for a runner should look like.

It’s somewhat embarrassing, but I want to tell you a quick story about my favorite time of day as a freshman in college. You might be thinking, “Saturday night!” or “Race day!” or maybe even “When Jason had class with that hot girl he had a crush on!”

Unfortunately, none of those are true. Being 99% residential, Connecticut College had a damn good dining hall and an unlimited meal plan.

Every day, I looked forward to dinner after cross country practice like a normal person does with Christmas. I had also learned that the human body doesn’t register the feeling of fullness or satisfaction from a meal until about 15 minutes after you start eating. So I loaded my tray with a big plate, several smaller plates, and at least one bowl – all full of food.

Then the eating would start. I literally loved to stuff my face full of whatever they were serving:

  • chicken breast sandwiches with double cheese, ranch dressing, and bacon
  • pepperoni pizza dipped in ranch dressing
  • barbecue pork subs with french fries
  • pasta with meat sauce and melted cheese
  • hot dogs, cheeseburgers, and more Lucky Charms than is reasonable or sane (I LOVE cereal)

Clearly, I had a problem. I was like the sheltered home-schooled kid who went buck wild and couldn’t contain his partying once he was set free from the parental leash. Except with food.

Fast forward to February of my Senior year. I had a physical over Winter Break and my lab work came back with a startling result: my total cholesterol was at 211 (under 200 is considered healthy) and my LDL and HDL levels were all out of whack.

After over 22 years of pristine health, I came to the unfortunate conclusion that I was not immune to the side effects of a shitty diet. Despite a healthy weight of about 132 pounds for my height of 5′ 7″ and high levels of exercise, I wasn’t as healthy as I could be.

The saying, “If the furnace is hot enough, it will burn anything” isn’t quite true – it clearly wasn’t burning through the excess cholesterol floating through my body. While cholesterol isn’t a great indicator of overall health (I now think slightly high cholesterol isn’t something to worry about), it made me realize that I needed to make some changes.


The Power of Diet for Runners: How to Eat for Endurance and Lose Weight Effortlessly

This is what happens with a Wholefoods gift card. I go crazy like a kid in a candy shop – or like a food fanatic who can’t control his craving for healthy, delicious snacks.

But I used to be a glutton. Being naturally skinny, I never had to worry about eating crappy food because I never gained an ounce. Running throughout high school and college only reinforced my bad eating habits. I had no idea what a healthy diet for a runner should look like.

It’s somewhat embarrassing, but I want to tell you a quick story about my favorite time of day as a freshman in college. You might be thinking, “Saturday night!” or “Race day!” or maybe even “When Jason had class with that hot girl he had a crush on!”

Unfortunately, none of those are true. Being 99% residential, Connecticut College had a damn good dining hall and an unlimited meal plan.

Every day, I looked forward to dinner after cross country practice like a normal person does with Christmas. I had also learned that the human body doesn’t register the feeling of fullness or satisfaction from a meal until about 15 minutes after you start eating. So I loaded my tray with a big plate, several smaller plates, and at least one bowl – all full of food.

Then the eating would start. I literally loved to stuff my face full of whatever they were serving:

  • chicken breast sandwiches with double cheese, ranch dressing, and bacon
  • pepperoni pizza dipped in ranch dressing
  • barbecue pork subs with french fries
  • pasta with meat sauce and melted cheese
  • hot dogs, cheeseburgers, and more Lucky Charms than is reasonable or sane (I LOVE cereal)

Clearly, I had a problem. I was like the sheltered home-schooled kid who went buck wild and couldn’t contain his partying once he was set free from the parental leash. Except with food.

Fast forward to February of my Senior year. I had a physical over Winter Break and my lab work came back with a startling result: my total cholesterol was at 211 (under 200 is considered healthy) and my LDL and HDL levels were all out of whack.

After over 22 years of pristine health, I came to the unfortunate conclusion that I was not immune to the side effects of a shitty diet. Despite a healthy weight of about 132 pounds for my height of 5′ 7″ and high levels of exercise, I wasn’t as healthy as I could be.

The saying, “If the furnace is hot enough, it will burn anything” isn’t quite true – it clearly wasn’t burning through the excess cholesterol floating through my body. While cholesterol isn’t a great indicator of overall health (I now think slightly high cholesterol isn’t something to worry about), it made me realize that I needed to make some changes.


The Power of Diet for Runners: How to Eat for Endurance and Lose Weight Effortlessly

This is what happens with a Wholefoods gift card. I go crazy like a kid in a candy shop – or like a food fanatic who can’t control his craving for healthy, delicious snacks.

But I used to be a glutton. Being naturally skinny, I never had to worry about eating crappy food because I never gained an ounce. Running throughout high school and college only reinforced my bad eating habits. I had no idea what a healthy diet for a runner should look like.

It’s somewhat embarrassing, but I want to tell you a quick story about my favorite time of day as a freshman in college. You might be thinking, “Saturday night!” or “Race day!” or maybe even “When Jason had class with that hot girl he had a crush on!”

Unfortunately, none of those are true. Being 99% residential, Connecticut College had a damn good dining hall and an unlimited meal plan.

Every day, I looked forward to dinner after cross country practice like a normal person does with Christmas. I had also learned that the human body doesn’t register the feeling of fullness or satisfaction from a meal until about 15 minutes after you start eating. So I loaded my tray with a big plate, several smaller plates, and at least one bowl – all full of food.

Then the eating would start. I literally loved to stuff my face full of whatever they were serving:

  • chicken breast sandwiches with double cheese, ranch dressing, and bacon
  • pepperoni pizza dipped in ranch dressing
  • barbecue pork subs with french fries
  • pasta with meat sauce and melted cheese
  • hot dogs, cheeseburgers, and more Lucky Charms than is reasonable or sane (I LOVE cereal)

Clearly, I had a problem. I was like the sheltered home-schooled kid who went buck wild and couldn’t contain his partying once he was set free from the parental leash. Except with food.

Fast forward to February of my Senior year. I had a physical over Winter Break and my lab work came back with a startling result: my total cholesterol was at 211 (under 200 is considered healthy) and my LDL and HDL levels were all out of whack.

After over 22 years of pristine health, I came to the unfortunate conclusion that I was not immune to the side effects of a shitty diet. Despite a healthy weight of about 132 pounds for my height of 5′ 7″ and high levels of exercise, I wasn’t as healthy as I could be.

The saying, “If the furnace is hot enough, it will burn anything” isn’t quite true – it clearly wasn’t burning through the excess cholesterol floating through my body. While cholesterol isn’t a great indicator of overall health (I now think slightly high cholesterol isn’t something to worry about), it made me realize that I needed to make some changes.


The Power of Diet for Runners: How to Eat for Endurance and Lose Weight Effortlessly

This is what happens with a Wholefoods gift card. I go crazy like a kid in a candy shop – or like a food fanatic who can’t control his craving for healthy, delicious snacks.

But I used to be a glutton. Being naturally skinny, I never had to worry about eating crappy food because I never gained an ounce. Running throughout high school and college only reinforced my bad eating habits. I had no idea what a healthy diet for a runner should look like.

It’s somewhat embarrassing, but I want to tell you a quick story about my favorite time of day as a freshman in college. You might be thinking, “Saturday night!” or “Race day!” or maybe even “When Jason had class with that hot girl he had a crush on!”

Unfortunately, none of those are true. Being 99% residential, Connecticut College had a damn good dining hall and an unlimited meal plan.

Every day, I looked forward to dinner after cross country practice like a normal person does with Christmas. I had also learned that the human body doesn’t register the feeling of fullness or satisfaction from a meal until about 15 minutes after you start eating. So I loaded my tray with a big plate, several smaller plates, and at least one bowl – all full of food.

Then the eating would start. I literally loved to stuff my face full of whatever they were serving:

  • chicken breast sandwiches with double cheese, ranch dressing, and bacon
  • pepperoni pizza dipped in ranch dressing
  • barbecue pork subs with french fries
  • pasta with meat sauce and melted cheese
  • hot dogs, cheeseburgers, and more Lucky Charms than is reasonable or sane (I LOVE cereal)

Clearly, I had a problem. I was like the sheltered home-schooled kid who went buck wild and couldn’t contain his partying once he was set free from the parental leash. Except with food.

Fast forward to February of my Senior year. I had a physical over Winter Break and my lab work came back with a startling result: my total cholesterol was at 211 (under 200 is considered healthy) and my LDL and HDL levels were all out of whack.

After over 22 years of pristine health, I came to the unfortunate conclusion that I was not immune to the side effects of a shitty diet. Despite a healthy weight of about 132 pounds for my height of 5′ 7″ and high levels of exercise, I wasn’t as healthy as I could be.

The saying, “If the furnace is hot enough, it will burn anything” isn’t quite true – it clearly wasn’t burning through the excess cholesterol floating through my body. While cholesterol isn’t a great indicator of overall health (I now think slightly high cholesterol isn’t something to worry about), it made me realize that I needed to make some changes.


The Power of Diet for Runners: How to Eat for Endurance and Lose Weight Effortlessly

This is what happens with a Wholefoods gift card. I go crazy like a kid in a candy shop – or like a food fanatic who can’t control his craving for healthy, delicious snacks.

But I used to be a glutton. Being naturally skinny, I never had to worry about eating crappy food because I never gained an ounce. Running throughout high school and college only reinforced my bad eating habits. I had no idea what a healthy diet for a runner should look like.

It’s somewhat embarrassing, but I want to tell you a quick story about my favorite time of day as a freshman in college. You might be thinking, “Saturday night!” or “Race day!” or maybe even “When Jason had class with that hot girl he had a crush on!”

Unfortunately, none of those are true. Being 99% residential, Connecticut College had a damn good dining hall and an unlimited meal plan.

Every day, I looked forward to dinner after cross country practice like a normal person does with Christmas. I had also learned that the human body doesn’t register the feeling of fullness or satisfaction from a meal until about 15 minutes after you start eating. So I loaded my tray with a big plate, several smaller plates, and at least one bowl – all full of food.

Then the eating would start. I literally loved to stuff my face full of whatever they were serving:

  • chicken breast sandwiches with double cheese, ranch dressing, and bacon
  • pepperoni pizza dipped in ranch dressing
  • barbecue pork subs with french fries
  • pasta with meat sauce and melted cheese
  • hot dogs, cheeseburgers, and more Lucky Charms than is reasonable or sane (I LOVE cereal)

Clearly, I had a problem. I was like the sheltered home-schooled kid who went buck wild and couldn’t contain his partying once he was set free from the parental leash. Except with food.

Fast forward to February of my Senior year. I had a physical over Winter Break and my lab work came back with a startling result: my total cholesterol was at 211 (under 200 is considered healthy) and my LDL and HDL levels were all out of whack.

After over 22 years of pristine health, I came to the unfortunate conclusion that I was not immune to the side effects of a shitty diet. Despite a healthy weight of about 132 pounds for my height of 5′ 7″ and high levels of exercise, I wasn’t as healthy as I could be.

The saying, “If the furnace is hot enough, it will burn anything” isn’t quite true – it clearly wasn’t burning through the excess cholesterol floating through my body. While cholesterol isn’t a great indicator of overall health (I now think slightly high cholesterol isn’t something to worry about), it made me realize that I needed to make some changes.