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Red-Wine Pot Roast with Porcini

Red-Wine Pot Roast with Porcini



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Ingredients

  • 1 cup low-salt chicken broth or beef broth
  • 1/2 ounce dried porcini mushrooms
  • 1 4-pound boneless beef chuck roast, trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped
  • 2 celery stalks with some leaves, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh marjoram plus sprigs for garnish
  • 1 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes, drained

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 300°F. Bring broth to simmer in saucepan. Remove from heat; add mushrooms, cover, and let stand until soft, about 15 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer mushrooms to cutting board. Chop coarsely. Reserve mushrooms and broth separately.

  • Sprinkle beef with salt and pepper. Heat oil in heavy large ovenproof pot over medium-high heat. Add beef and cook until brown on all sides, about 15 minutes total. Transfer beef to large plate. Pour off all but 1 tablespoon drippings from pot. Place pot over medium heat. Add onion and celery. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and sauté until beginning to brown, about 8 minutes. Add garlic, chopped marjoram, and reserved porcini mushrooms; sauté 1 minute. Using hands, crush tomatoes, 1 at a time, into pot. Cook 3 minutes, stirring frequently and scraping up browned bits from bottom of pot. Add wine; boil 5 minutes. Add reserved mushroom broth, leaving any sediment behind. Boil 5 minutes.

  • Return beef and any accumulated juices to pot. Cover; transfer to oven. Cook 1 1/2 hours. Turn beef and continue cooking until tender, about 1 1/2 hours longer. DO AHEAD Can be made 2 days ahead. Cool slightly. Refrigerate uncovered until cool. Cover and keep refrigerated.

  • Transfer beef to cutting board; tent with foil. Spoon fat from surface of juices in pot. Bring juices to boil; cook until liquid is reduced to 4 cups, about 7 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

  • Cut beef into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Transfer to platter. Spoon juices over, garnish with marjoram sprigs, and serve.

Reviews Section

Lidia’s Insanely Delicious Italian Beef Roasted in Barolo Wine

photo: Alex Province

Imagine a round of beef sitting in two bottles of rich Barolo wine, roasting away in your oven, its aromas seducing you no matter where you walk in the house… this is pleasure land. That beef, when it’s done, will be fork tender, almost melting into a sauce that looks like red velvet.

To say we bayed at the moon when we ate it is only slightly exaggeratory. We did keel over when we made and devoured this in the studio, and drank glasses of Barolo.

This isn’t a hard recipe you brown the outside of the meat a little to bring out its flavor, then submerge it halfway in the wine. It’s wildly good.

ON-DEMAND: Listen to Faith and the gang rave about Lidia’s Beef Roasted in Barolo Wine recipe during an episode of The Faith Middleton Food Schmooze®. And, subscribe to the podcast so you never miss a drop of pleasure.

  • 5 pound boneless beef-roast (flat-iron, chuck, or bottom round), trimmed of fat
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt plus more to taste
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium onions 1 pound total, quartered
  • 3 carrots large, peeled and cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 4 stalks celery cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 6 cloves garlic plump, crushed and peeled
  • 2 sprigs rosemary fresh
  • 6 sage leaves large, fresh
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg freshly grated
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 cup porcini mushrooms dried, loosely packed, rinsed
  • 2 bottles Barolo wine 750 milliliters each
  • 2 cups beef stock or as needed (see note below)
  • black pepper freshly ground

*Lidia uses her own Mixed Meat Stock, which can be found on page 144 of her cookbook Lidia's Mastering the Art of Italian Cuisine. We used a good quality beef stock.


Put the dried mushrooms in a large jug, then add 600ml (1pt) of boiling water. Allow to stand for 10 mins. With a slotted spoon, remove the mushrooms and chop finely, then add them back to the jug.

Melt the butter in a large saucepan, then stir in the garlic and cook for 1 min. Mix in the cornflour and cook, stirring, for 1 min. Stir in the turkey juices into the pan and then add the red wine. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 2 mins.

Mix in the mushroom stock and season. Simmer for 5-8 mins, until thick. Serve.

RECIPE AND FOOD STYLING: LIZ O’KEEFE


For exact ingredient measures and step-by-step instructions, please follow the recipe card below. However, the general steps are as follows:

  1. Sear the roast
    This step is optional, but searing the meat will lock in some flavors, making this dish even tastier. So if you have an extra 5-10 minutes, we highly recommend this step.
  2. Add the ingredients to the crockpot
    Add the rest of your ingredients to the pot, including potatoes, carrots, and broth. Also, don&rsquot add too much stock to the mixture because the meat will release enough of its own juices. So, you do not want to overdo it.
  3. Cook
    Stir the ingredients gently, top with fresh thyme and cook on low for 6-8 hours or on high for 4-5 hours.
  4. Serve
    Enjoy it warm over some mashed potatoes.

Can you refrigerate the beef from the slow cooker?

Yes. After cooking the meat, store it in a large airtight container in the fridge. Make sure that the beef is at least partially covered by the sauce, so it doesn&rsquot dry out. Store for up to 3-4 days.


Porcini Pot Roast

There are numerous ways to braise tough cuts of beef for pot roast. While "fork-tender" is generally the term to imply proper doneness, we believe you should be able to cut it with a spoon. This recipe calls for chuck roast because of its rich flavor and good fat content, and dried porcini mushrooms amp up the umami. Feel free to tuck in some root vegetables for the last hour or so of cooking, or slow-roast sweet potatoes while braising for a complete meal.

If you can't find dried porcini mushrooms, consider other varieties, such as shiitakes and morels.

Active time: 30 mins Total time: 4 hours and 30 mins

Make Ahead: The pot roast can be made up to 1 day before you plan to serve it. To serve, reheat in a 300-degree oven until the desired temperature is reached.

Storage Notes: The pot roast can be refrigerated for up to 4 days, or frozen, tightly wrapped for up to 2 months.

Servings:

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Ingredients
Directions

Position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 300 degrees. Meanwhile, soak the porcini in the hot water for 30 minutes. (This is a good time to prep the rest of the ingredients.)

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the mushrooms to a fine-mesh sieve (reserve the soaking water). Rinse the mushrooms briefly under cold, running water (they can be gritty), pat dry with a paper towel or clean dish towel and coarsely chop. Strain the mushroom soaking liquid through a mesh strainer lined with cheesecloth or paper towels into a bowl.

Pat the meat dry with paper towels and generously season all over with the salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or other large ovenproof pot with a lid over medium-high heat, heat the oil until shimmering. Add the meat and brown on all sides, 15 to 20 minutes total transfer to a platter.

Add the onions, garlic, thyme and the mushrooms, sprinkle with some salt and pepper, and cook, stirring frequently, until the onions start to soften and become translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the tomato paste and cook, stirring frequently, for 1 minute more. Add the red wine and deglaze the pan, scraping up any bits stuck to the bottom. Add the seared meat, with any accumulated juices, along with enough of the mushroom soaking liquid to come about halfway up the meat (the amount of liquid you’ll need will vary with the size of the roast as well as the cooking vessel), bring to a simmer, cover and transfer to the oven.

Cook, flipping the roast and checking on tenderness every 45 minutes, until fork- (or spoon-) tender, 3 hours to 3 hours 30 minutes. Transfer the meat to a large, rimmed platter, discard the string (if present), and skim the fat from the braising liquid. (If serving the following day, you can cool and refrigerate the pot roast to more easily scrape the fat off the top once it's chilled.)

Taste the braising liquid and season with additional salt and/or pepper, if desired, then pour it over the pot roast and serve warm.


Porcini Pot Roast

There are numerous ways to braise tough cuts of beef for pot roast. While "fork-tender" is generally the term to imply proper doneness, we believe you should be able to cut it with a spoon. This recipe calls for chuck roast because of its rich flavor and good fat content, and dried porcini mushrooms amp up the umami. Feel free to tuck in some root vegetables for the last hour or so of cooking, or slow-roast sweet potatoes while braising for a complete meal.

If you can't find dried porcini mushrooms, consider other varieties, such as shiitakes and morels.

Active time: 30 mins Total time: 4 hours and 30 mins

Make Ahead: The pot roast can be made up to 1 day before you plan to serve it. To serve, reheat in a 300-degree oven until the desired temperature is reached.

Storage Notes: The pot roast can be refrigerated for up to 4 days, or frozen, tightly wrapped for up to 2 months.

Servings:

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Ingredients
Directions

Position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 300 degrees. Meanwhile, soak the porcini in the hot water for 30 minutes. (This is a good time to prep the rest of the ingredients.)

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the mushrooms to a fine-mesh sieve (reserve the soaking water). Rinse the mushrooms briefly under cold, running water (they can be gritty), pat dry with a paper towel or clean dish towel and coarsely chop. Strain the mushroom soaking liquid through a mesh strainer lined with cheesecloth or paper towels into a bowl.

Pat the meat dry with paper towels and generously season all over with the salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or other large ovenproof pot with a lid over medium-high heat, heat the oil until shimmering. Add the meat and brown on all sides, 15 to 20 minutes total transfer to a platter.

Add the onions, garlic, thyme and the mushrooms, sprinkle with some salt and pepper, and cook, stirring frequently, until the onions start to soften and become translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the tomato paste and cook, stirring frequently, for 1 minute more. Add the red wine and deglaze the pan, scraping up any bits stuck to the bottom. Add the seared meat, with any accumulated juices, along with enough of the mushroom soaking liquid to come about halfway up the meat (the amount of liquid you’ll need will vary with the size of the roast as well as the cooking vessel), bring to a simmer, cover and transfer to the oven.

Cook, flipping the roast and checking on tenderness every 45 minutes, until fork- (or spoon-) tender, 3 hours to 3 hours 30 minutes. Transfer the meat to a large, rimmed platter, discard the string (if present), and skim the fat from the braising liquid. (If serving the following day, you can cool and refrigerate the pot roast to more easily scrape the fat off the top once it's chilled.)

Taste the braising liquid and season with additional salt and/or pepper, if desired, then pour it over the pot roast and serve warm.


  • 1 3 to 4-pound pot roast (lean chuck, bottom round, or rump)
  • 3 tablespoons flour (all-purpose)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion (halved, thinly sliced)
  • 1 rib celery (thinly sliced)
  • 8 ounces whole small button mushrooms (trimmed, washed, or sliced mushrooms)
  • 4 cloves garlic (smashed and minced)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram (or thyme)
  • 1 small bay leaf
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1 cup dry red wine (such as pinot noir/burgundy or cabernet)
  • 1 can (28 ounces) crushed tomatoes

In a large stockpot or Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over high heat. Combine flour with salt and pepper dredge the pot roast in the mixture. Brown the roast quickly on all sides in the hot oil.

Add the onions, celery, and mushrooms reduce heat to medium and saute, stirring frequently, for about 2 to 4 minutes.

Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute longer.

Add the thyme or marjoram, bay leaf, chicken broth, wine, and tomatoes bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low cover and simmer for 2 to 2 1/2 hours, or until the beef is very tender.


Place Dried Porcini Mushrooms in small bowl and pour boiling water over. Let stand for about 10 minutes, then remove mushrooms with slotted spoon. Strain soaking liquid through coffee filter to remove fine particles, and reserve.

Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium-high heat in large, heavy-bottom pot with lid, such as a Dutch oven. Season beef with salt and pepper and add to pan. Sear on all sides until well browned. Transfer to plate.

Reduce heat to medium. If necessary, add 1 tablespoon olive oil to pot. Add onions, and cook, stirring often, until tender, about 7 minutes. Add garlic, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.

Deglaze with red wine, scraping pan to release caramelized bits.

Add mushrooms and their soaking liquid, along with broth, tomatoes and herbs. Return beef to pot, along with any juices on plate.

Cover pot and place in oven for 1-1/2 hours. Turn the beef over, and return to oven for another 1-1/2 hours, until beef is tender.

Transfer beef to cutting board, tenting with foil to keep warm. Skim fat from juices in pot, then bring to a boil and reduce to 4 cups. Season to taste with additional salt and black pepper.


Slow-Cooker Pot Roast with Porcini Mushroom Gravy Pot roast is one of my favorite things to make on Sundays or for big family gatherings. It makes the house smell amazing as it cooks away and really is a comfort food! I have made this pot roast dozens of times and it has become kind of famous among-st my friends and family! I love this recipe because it is basically fool-proof, and the meat turns out melt-in-your-mouth tender every time. The gravy is also full of flavor! If you are nervous about porcini mushrooms or don&rsquot think you like them, don&rsquot worry. They get pureed up into the gravy and give the sauce a wonderful depth of flavor. Nobody can ever guess they are the secret ingredient! I like porcini mushrooms best, but you can use any kind of dried mushrooms you can find. I often add yukon gold potatoes and chopped carrots to this about 1 ½ hours before it&rsquos done cooking. I just add them right on top of the meat. Then when the meat is done, you have an entire meal! This is also delicious over mashed potatoes, polenta, or buttered noodles. This pot roast makes a great holiday meal! Hungry for more? Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter for all of the latest updates. Red Wine-Braised Pot Roast

Pot roast may be served right away, but like most braises, it tastes even better when made ahead and left to sit for a day or two. Follow the method through the oven-braising, and transfer the meat and vegetables to a platter. Strain and degrease the juices as directed, wipe out the pot, and then return the meat and vegetables to the pot and pour the strained juices over all. Let cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate for up to three days. To serve, gently reheat the roast in the pot until the juices are once again liquified. Transfer the meat and vegetables to a baking dish, moisten with some of the juices, cover, and heat in a 325°F oven until warmed through. While the meat and vegetables are warming, proceed with the recipe as directed to make a sauce from the juices.

Pot roast patties Using cold leftover pot roast that includes potatoes, separate the meat and vegetables as best you can from the gelatinous sauce. Chop up the meat and vegetables, and mix together in a bowl with a tablespoon or two of Dijon mustard (which adds flavor and also helps the mixture hold together). Shape into patties and sauté in oil or butter over medium to medium-high heat until crusty and browned on the outside and hot on the inside.

French dip sandwiches Slice baguettes into 5- or 6-inch lengths and then split them almost but not entirely in half lengthwise. (Or use crusty sub rolls.) Heat the leftovers until hot. Slice the meat and arrange in the baguettes. Serve the sandwiches with individual dishes of the sauce on the side for dipping. Hot mustard is a good condiment for these sandwiches, and you can serve the leftover vegetables as a side dish or save them for another meal.

Shepherd’s pie Warm the leftovers just enough to liquefy the sauce. Shred or chop the meat and combine with the vegetables. Add enough sauce to make the mixture taste nicely moist but not super juicy. Transfer the mixture to a casserole dish and cover with a 1-inch layer of mashed potatoes (flavored with Cheddar or horseradish, if you like). Drizzle the potatoes with a little olive oil and then bake in a 375°F oven until the potatoes are lightly browned on top, about 30 minutes.


Watch the video: How to Cook Perfect Roast Beef. Jamie Oliver (August 2022).